DISTANCE TO INTERSTELLAR SPACE


Jia-Rui Cook

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. June 15, 2011 NEWS RELEASE: 2011-182

Scientists analyzing recent data from NASA’s Voyager and Cassini spacecraft have calculated that Voyager 1 could cross over into the frontier of interstellar space at any time and much earlier than previously thought.  The findings are detailed in this week’s issue of the journal Nature.

Data from Voyager’s low-energy charged particle instrument, first reported in December 2010, have indicated that the outward speed of the charged particles streaming from the sun has slowed to zero.  The stagnation of this solar wind has continued through at least February 2011, marking a thick, previously unpredicted “transition zone” at the edge of our solar system.

“There is one time we are going to cross that frontier, and this is the first sign it is upon us,” said Tom Krimigis, principal investigator for Voyager’s low-energy charged particle instrument and Cassini’s magnetospheric imaging instrument, based at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md.

Krimigis and colleagues combined the new Voyager data with previously unpublished measurements from the ion and neutral camera on Cassini’s magnetospheric imaging instrument.  The Cassini instrument collects data on neutral atoms streaming into our solar system from the outside.

The analysis indicates that the boundary between interstellar space and the bubble of charged particles the sun blows around itself is likely between 10 and 14 billion miles (16 to 23 billion kilometers) from the sun, with a best estimate of approximately 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers).  Since Voyager 1 is already nearly 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) out, it could cross into interstellar space at any time.

“These calculations show we’re getting close, but how close?  That’s what we don’t know, but Voyager 1 speeds outward a billion miles every three years, so we may not have long to wait,” said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist, based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Scientists intend to keep analyzing the Voyager 1 data, looking for confirmation.  They will also be studying the Voyager 2 data, but Voyager 2 is not as close to the edge of the solar system as Voyager 1.  Voyager 2 is about 9 billion miles (14 billion kilometers) away from the sun.

Launched in 1977, the Voyager twin spacecraft have been on a 33-year journey.  They are humanity’s farthest working deep space sentinels en route to reach the edge of interstellar space.  The Voyagers were built by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which continues to operate both spacecraft.  The Voyager missions are a part of the NASA Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.  JPL is managed for NASA by Caltech.

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Final Frontier

At the edge of the solar system, Voyager 1 is reporting a sharp increase in cosmic rays that could herald the spacecraft’s long-awaited entry into interstellar space.

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 Change

The contents of the record were selected for NASA by a committee chaired by Carl Sagan of Cornell University, et. al. Dr. Sagan and his associates assembled 115 images and a variety of natural sounds, such as those made by surf, wind and thunder, birds, whales, and other animals.  To this they added musical selections from different cultures and eras, and spoken greetings from Earth-people in fifty-five languages, and printed messages from President Carter and U.N. Secretary General Waldheim.

Each record is encased in a protective aluminum jacket, together with a cartridge and a needle. Instructions, in symbolic language, explain the origin of the spacecraft and indicate how the record is to be played.  The 115 images are encoded in analog form.  The remainder of the record is in audio, designed to be played at 16-2/3 revolutions per minute. It contains the spoken greetings, beginning with Akkadian, which was spoken in Sumer about six thousand years ago, and ending with Wu, a modern Chinese dialect.

Following the section on the sounds of Earth, there is an eclectic 90-minute selection of music, including both Eastern and Western classics and a variety of ethnic music. Once the Voyager spacecraft leave the solar system (by 1990, both will be beyond the orbit of Pluto), they will find themselves in empty space.  It will be forty thousand years before they make a close approach to any other planetary system.  As Carl Sagan has noted, “The spacecraft will be encountered and the record played only if there are advanced spacefaring civilizations in interstellar space.  But the launching of this bottle into the cosmic ocean says something very hopeful about life on this planet.”

Whats on the Gold Record

 John Lee Hooker was one of the last links to the blues of the deep South.

The Aliens would have liked this.  Too bad the record on Voyager 1 can’t have updates,  lot has happen since then.

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