Law Enforcement Officers Going to Jail

Once outside working, now going in.

The worst thing to happen to a law enforcement officer is going to jail (inmates don’t like crooked cops) and losing his or her pension.  Well, the DOJ has just released an investigation performed by the FBI’s Charlotte Division, Raleigh Resident Agency.  Eight current and former Law Enforcement Officers, four correctional officers, and others sentenced for their participation in drug distribution conspiracy.  I’m certain more news of this nature is coming to a town near you, it gets tiring for the unjust sleeping with one eye open and health fading, it’s what nightmares are made of.

DOJ Press Release Number 17-663:

June 15, 2017

Eight current and former law enforcement officers, four correctional officers and two other individuals have been sentenced for their participation in trafficking narcotics and narcotics proceeds for a purported large-scale drug trafficking organization.  The individuals used their affiliation with law enforcement to make money by protecting shipments of purported narcotics and narcotics proceeds.

Acting Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Blanco of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney John Stuart Bruce of the Eastern District of North Carolina made the announcement.

Senior United States District Court Judge Malcolm J. Howard sentenced the following 14 defendants on a variety of charges, including conspiracy to distribute illegal narcotics, firearm charges and bribery charges: Lann Tjuan Clanton, 38, of Garysburg, N.C., was sentenced to 195 months in prison; Ikeisha Jacobs, 34, of Rich Square, N.C., was sentenced to 120 months in prison; Jason Boone, 31, of Henrico, N.C., was sentenced to 96 months in prison; Wardie Vincent Jr., 37, of Henrico, N.C., was sentenced to 72 months in prison; Adrienne Moody, 39, of Roanoke Rapids, N.C., was sentenced to 87 months in prison; Cory Jackson, 45, of Garysburg, N.C., was sentenced to 87 months in prison; Jimmy Pair Jr., 51, of Pleasant Hill, N.C., was sentenced to 87 months in prison; Curtis Boone, 38, of Gaston, N.C., was sentenced to 87 months in prison; Thomas Jefferson Allen II, 39, of Roanoke Rapids, N.C., was sentenced to 87 months in prison; Alaina Sue-Kam-Ling, 28, of Charlotte, N.C., was sentenced to 38 months in prison; Kavon Phillips, 27, of Rich Square, N.C., was sentenced to 57 months in prison; Alphonso Ponton, 45, of Weldon, N.C., was sentenced to 48 months in prison; Crystal Pierce, 33, of Roanoke Rapids, N.C., was sentenced to 6 months in prison and 6 months of house arrest; and Tohsa Dailey, 37, of Garysburg, N.C., was sentenced to 24 months in prison.

According to factual statements made in connection with the defendants’ guilty pleas, at the time of the crimes charged, Jacobs, Jason Boone, Pair Jr., Curtis Boone and Allen were Deputy Sheriffs at the Northampton County Sheriff’s Office; Clanton, Vincent Jr. and Jackson were former law enforcement officers; Moody, Sue-Kam-Ling, Phillips and Ponton were correctional officers; and Dailey was a 911 dispatch operator for Northampton County.

The charges stemmed from a large-scale undercover investigation into allegations of systemic law enforcement corruption in Northampton County. Admissions made in connection with the defendants’ guilty pleas revealed that during the course of the undercover investigation, the defendants aided in transporting purported illegal narcotics and illegal narcotics proceeds through North Carolina and elsewhere in exchange for thousands of dollars of payments.

In May 2017, a jury convicted a fifteenth defendant, Antonio Tillmon, 33, of Windsor, N.C., of drug, firearm and bribery charges relating to this scheme. Tillmon, a former North Carolina police officer, is set for sentencing during the Court’s September 12, term. All 15 defendants indicted in this case have now been convicted of various offenses.

The case was investigated by the FBI’s Charlotte Division, Raleigh Resident Agency. The case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorneys Lauren Bell and Molly Gaston of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Toby W. Lathan of the Eastern District of North Carolina. (end DOJ press release)

Officer K-9 “I told them to cool it but you can’t fix stupid”

It’s quite ironic to have a career around a cell block, then you find yourself inside and once the door clangs shut will be the most haunting sound of one’s career.  Once thought of as a tough guy ends up being a shivering piece of meat.  “King Nothing are you satisfied?”